Fashion magazines

   The first publication to feature fashion was France's Le Mercure Galant in 1678. Fashion illustrations, in the form of fashion plates, depicted the latest in fashion trends and listed suppliers' names. As interest in fashion steadily increased between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries, other French, English, and German fashion publications emerged, such as Lady's Magazine, La Belle Assemblée, Godey's Lady's Book, Ackerman's Repository of the Arts, Le Cabinet des Modes, Le journal des dames et des modes, the Gallery of Fashion, Journal der Luxus und der Moden, the Englishwomen 's Domestic Magazine, the Queen, and Myra 's Journal of Dress and Fashion. By the mid nineteenth century, as literacy levels increased, more women bought magazines, as they now included information articles, poems, stories, and, on occasion, paper patterns. In 1867, Harper's Bazaar became the first fashion magazine to be printed in the United States, initially in newspaper format but, by 1901, as a monthly magazine. Vogue magazine followed, first as a weekly fashion publication and then as a monthly magazine in 1909. By 1913, archrivals Harper's Bazaar and Vogue began featuring fashion photography. Both magazines catered to an affluent reader and over the years launched numerous careers in the fashion industry, from illustrators, designers, models, and photographers to their own colorful and sometimes controversial, editors-in-chief. Carmel Snow, who began her career at Vogue, defected to Bazaar in 1934 and, as editor-in-chief, was credited with revolutionizing fashion magazines. She made stars of Parisian designers Cristobal Balenciaga, Coco Chanel, Christian Dior, and Yves Saint Laurent and fashion photographers Cecil Beaton, Edward Steichen, Louise Dahl-Wolfe, and Richard Avedon. She is also responsible for being the first to promote American designers. Vogue on the other hand, represented a more European high-fashion/high-society point of view. Vogue Paris, Vogue Italia, and Vogue United States are arguably the most influential magazines of the fashion world. As early as the 1930s, Vogue created the concept of the supermodel. In 1940, they began coverage of American designers. Famous Vogue editors, such as Diana Vreeland (1963-1971) and its current editor Anna Wintour, enjoy colorful, sometimes infamous reputations. Today, Condé Nast publishes sixteen editions of Vogue throughout the world with circulation figures estimated at more than 1.2 million. Harper's Bazaar, owned by the Hearst Corporation, is published in 18 countries with its circulation in the 750,000 range. Most magazines survive largely on advertising money and therefore it is not uncommon for the September issue of Vogue U.S. to contain more than 700 pages, mostly advertisements. Other magazines specializing in women's fashion include Glamour, Elle, Marie Claire, InStyle, and Cosmopolitan. Magazines for men include Gentlemen's Quarterly (GQ), Esquire, and Men's Vogue. Fashion magazines aimed at teenagers are Teen Vogue (U.S.), Vogue Girl (Australia), and Cosmo Girl (U.S.). Even babies have their own fashion magazines, such as Vogue Bambino (Italy). Today, fashion magazines are more than just aspirational trend sources for fashion and beauty; they provide thoughtful coverage of current social, economic, and health issues, travel information and other useful information for the modern working woman. Magazines such as Vogue and Harper's Bazaar are going beyond the printed pages, using their influence in a number of ways to help new designers get started, to promote health awareness, and to support philanthropic causes. Thanks to the Internet revolution, fashion magazines are offered online as e-zines.

Historical Dictionary of the Fashion Industry. .

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Fashion Magazines — Allure (United States) Another Magazine (United Kingdom) Apparel (China, United States) BiBi Magazine (United States) Book Moda (Italy) Book Moda Sposa (Italy) Book Moda Uomo (Italy) Brides (United States) Cadena (Germany) Children s Business… …   Historical Dictionary of the Fashion Industry

  • Fashion advertising —    Fashion advertising can be traced back to fashion plates, which were introduced in France and England during the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. These fashion illustrations were the first advertising vehicles used to sell clothing.… …   Historical Dictionary of the Fashion Industry

  • Fashion illustration —    The art of drawing costume images dates back to sixteenth century costume books that depicted regional and ethnic dress. Beginning in France and England during the seventeenth century and continuing through the eighteenth and nineteenth… …   Historical Dictionary of the Fashion Industry

  • Fashion editor —    This person is responsible for creating and/or supervising the fashion editorial content of print or electronic media, outlets such as fashion magazines, newspapers, television, or Internet sites. Fashion editors possess excellent journalistic …   Historical Dictionary of the Fashion Industry

  • Fashion journalism — is an umbrella term used to describe all aspects of published fashion media. Sometimes referred to as fashion writers, fashion critics or fashion reporters. The most obvious examples of fashion journalism are the fashion features in magazines and …   Wikipedia

  • Fashion journalism —    This type of journalism is mainly defined as the communication of fashion information using a variety of means whether through trend related reportage or subjective commentary. Fashion journalists can cover fashion shows and events or write… …   Historical Dictionary of the Fashion Industry

  • Fashion journalist —    A person who covers fashion through any one of a number of media: magazines, books, periodicals, television, radio, Internet, and broadcast. Some of the most famous fashion journalists include Bill Cunningham, Carrie Donovan, Eleanor Lambert,… …   Historical Dictionary of the Fashion Industry

  • Fashion forecast service —    A company that specializes in predicting fashion trends, color, and silhouette direction to the fashion industry. These predictions, which are made more than a year in advance of products making it to the selling floor, cover multiple areas of …   Historical Dictionary of the Fashion Industry

  • Fashion photographer —    A person who specializes in taking photographs of fashion for advertising or editorial purposes to appear in magazines, trade publications, catalogs, press kits, Internet, and elsewhere. Among the best known fashion photographers are Richard… …   Historical Dictionary of the Fashion Industry

  • Fashion Photojournalist —    A person who specializes in taking photographs of fashion for advertising or editorial purposes to appear in magazines, trade publications, catalogs, press kits, Internet, and elsewhere. Among the best known fashion photographers are Richard… …   Historical Dictionary of the Fashion Industry

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